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makiroses
04 September 2009 @ 01:54 pm


Be back in a month.
 
 
makiroses
22 June 2009 @ 10:39 pm
Sunday mornings don't feel the same
Sometimes I feel like I'm going insane without you here
A car pulls in the driveway
Something's gonna happen here today
I fall on my knees
As I watch that American flag blowing
In the breeze

And I tell myself you're gonna come home
Doesn't make it any easier to know
That you might be out there all alone
And all I can pray is that you come home
Baby come home

Black shoes on the pavement
My mind runs through everything I said
But never meant
I would take it all back for just one kiss
Please sir, tell me anything
Anything but this

And I tell myself you're gonna come home
Doesn't make it any easier to know
That you might be out there all alone
And all I can pray is that you come home
Baby come home

He knelt beside me on my knees
Took my hand, said "Ma'am
Would you look up at me please?"
My heart wouldn't beat forever
As I lifted my eyes towards the heavens
When you stepped out of that car
I got on my feet and ran into your arms

You said I told you I was gonna come home
And if it makes it any easier to know
I had your love, I was never alone
So dry your eyes, cos I'm finally home
Baby I'm home
 
 
makiroses
31 December 2008 @ 10:22 am
A little bit about my boring job that I love so dearly... well. Most aspects of it.

"Geospatial engineering is the art and science of applied geospatial information, from raw or exploited data, about geographic (contextual or spatial) and temporal phenomena related to the earth, its subsurface, its bodies of water, its atmosphere, and immediately adjacent regions of space for military tactical operations.

Within the military decision-making process (MDMP), the art of geospatial engineering is the ability to understand the commander's intent, [mission, enemy, terrain and weather, troops available, time available, and civil considerations] METT-TC, and geospatial information available, in order to evaluate and visualize the battlespace environment (Step 1 of the [intelligence preparation of the battlefield] IPB). This is then employed to create geospatial products and explain the military significance of the terrain (Step 2 of the IBP) to the commander and battle staff, enabling operational maneuver, mission planning and rehearsal, training, and precise targeting with the full understanding of the data, including intent of use and limitations.

The science of geospatial engineering is the exploitation of geospatial information by the engineer terrain team's use of high-end computer workstations and software to manipulate the data to render spatially co-referenced information about the earth, with temporal tags (metadata), arranged in a coherent structure and format to support military operations, measurement, mapping, visualization, modeling, spatial reasoning, terrain evaluation, and many other applications."



*snuggles it*
 
 
makiroses
21 April 2008 @ 11:19 am
So here we are. I barely know where to start. Most of today and tomorrow are going to be spent packing and saying last minute goodbyes, then Wednesday I'm gone from the internets until July. I'm trying my best not to make this overemotional, because no one likes an emo kid. I'm going to look back at this in a few months and go "Damn chick, shut the hell up."

Anyway, I wanted to say I love and will miss you guys, and please please write to me. I'm going to have someone log onto my journal while I'm in basic and post my address so you can send me letters. Even if it's just a short letter, or pictures or something. I can get pictures! Please don't send any packages, and please don't send any envelopes covered in stickers or sparkles or doodled on or something. Just plain white with black ink is good. I'll really appreciate it, and I'll write back to you as often as possible; if you don't hear from me right away or at all, know that letter writing time is very limited, and I promise I'll make it up to you when I get back because your letters are extremely important to me.
Before I forget: PLEASE EMAIL ME YOUR ADDRESS OR PUT IT IN THE COMMENTS. COMMENTS WILL BE SCREENED.

My email is phoenix4_pegusus@hotmail.com.

Alright, I better get going now. Again, I love you and I'll miss you.
I'll be back online in July and back home again at Christmas.

Bye lovers.

<3<3<3
 
 
makiroses
15 April 2008 @ 05:21 pm
I leave for basic training on the 23rd.
My going away party is this Saturday, the 19th, at my uncle's house.This will be one of the last times I will be available to hang out until I come home around Christmas.

The address is:

3629 Harvard Dr.
Holiday, Fl. 34691

It starts at 11 and ends when the last person leaves, so feel free to come by whenever and stay for as long as you want.

My cell # is 727-359-4286.

If you're going to come, please leave me a comment or call me to let me know, so I can plan for the proper amount of people. Even if you're not 100% sure you can make it but you're going to try, leave me a comment.

Hope I see you there.

~M
 
 
 
 
makiroses
09 December 2007 @ 07:01 am
Sometimes, there aren't many other places you'd rather be than driving down an empty highway at 7 in the morning with the sun rising next to you and Blind Melon playing in your speakers.
We may complain about it a lot, but there's just something magical about the way the mist rises off the fields that turns the horizon just the right shade of lavender.



All I can say is that my life is pretty plain... I like watching the puddles gather rain...
 
 
makiroses
18 November 2007 @ 04:25 pm
Hey, who wants to hear something awesome?

"According to a Congress watchdog report released last year, the US Army has spent 200 million dollars in 10 years to replace the estimated 10,000 homosexual soldiers forced to leave the military."

So that's why America hasn't met its recruiting goals for the past eight years. Huh.
 
 
makiroses
17 November 2007 @ 04:38 pm
http://www.letssaythanks.com

Let's Say Thanks is a program run by Xerox to send postcards to troops stationed overseas. All you have to do is take two minutes of your time, click the link, choose a postcard and a thank you note, and click "Send postcard." You don't even have to type in your name if you don't want to. It's completely free, and you can do it as many times as you want.

If you need any motivation, head over to the From the Troops page and read the thank you letters and notes from troops that received these postcards. Please, take two minutes of your day and send a postcard or two for the people that protect you, and pass this on so that other people can see it too.
 
 
makiroses
31 October 2007 @ 04:31 pm
Today's Google design is pretty awesome.